Spider Control & Extermination

Arachnophobia – the fear of spiders – is one of the most common fears in the United States. While most spiders are harmless to humans, there are a few species that are extremely dangerous or potentially deadly.

Pest Authority’s Barrier 360 treatment will protect your home from all kinds of spiders. Barrier 360 is a quarterly exterior treatment that establishes a spider-proof barrier around your home, so you’ll never have to worry about spiders making their way inside your home. If they do get in? Just give us a call, and our technicians will perform interior treatments at no extra cost.

No Contracts. No Commitments. No Spiders. Guaranteed.
Common Venomous Spiders in the United States:

Black widows are small, black spiders that often have a bright red stripe or hourglass-shaped mark on their abdomens. Female black widow spiders are considered the most venomous spider in the United States. Their venom is 15 times more toxic than rattlesnake venom – but don’t panic too much. Less than 1% of people bitten by a black widow die as a result of the bite. However, black widows can still pose a serious threat to your health and induce symptoms like nausea, hypertension, abdominal pain, and difficulty breathing due to paralysis of the diaphragm. Black widows typically nest in dark, covered areas like mailboxes or underneath outdoor furniture, and they can become aggressive when cornered or threatened.

Brown recluse spiders are also known as violin spiders or fiddleback spiders due to their characteristic dark brown, violin-shaped marking. They tend to hide in dark places like wood piles, attics, and cupboards. It’s important to wear gloves and tuck your pants into your boots when working outside or cleaning out your attic to avoid getting bitten by a cornered brown recluse. Their bites are dangerous to humans, and in extreme cases, they can even lead to necrosis, a condition where living cells die and leave behind a serious open wound. Less severe symptoms of a brown recluse bite include fever, itching, nausea, convulsions, and muscle pain.

Hobo spiders can be difficult to identify due to the fact that they come in various shades of brown and closely resemble many other types of spiders. They’re most commonly found in the Pacific Northwest United States and prefer damp, dark places like basements and garages. There is some scientific debate over the health risks of a hobo spider bite, but since they so closely resemble other types of spiders – like the brown recluse – the effects of their bites have not been conclusively confirmed. However, you should still seek medical attention immediately if you suspect you’ve been bitten by a hobo spider.

Tips on Avoiding Spider Bites and Infestations:

  • Get rid of as much clutter as possible, especially cardboard boxes.
  • Cut back tree branches so that they’re not touching your house.
  • Always shake out your shoes before putting them on.
  • Clean your gutters on a regular basis.
  • Store your clothing in sealed plastic bags and your shoes in sealed plastic boxes.
  • Move your bed so it’s not touching any walls or curtains.
  • Don’t use bed skirts, especially if they reach all the way to the ground.
  • If your clothes or linens have been on the ground, shake them out and inspect them before use.

Questions? Contact Us Today!

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